It’s Amazing How Much We Repeat What We See and Hear

25 Sayings

Have you been using these phrases unknowingly (click picture to enlarge)?  I know that I have used a couple on occasion.  It’s amazing how much we repeat what we hear and don’t truly understand how it impacts others.  Our kids, for those of us who have them, are especially impacted by the words that we speak.  I’m not saying that there’s anything wrong with these phrases but I am saying that we should probably make sure that we’re stating them correctly.

I am much more concerned these days about uttering negative words or phrases about others, or really anything negative for that matter.  As it says in the great book called the Bible, “Death and Life are in the power of the tongue”.   Words are powerful.  Hence, it is best to utter words that are positive, and when we do let’s ensure that we’re using or stating them properly so that we’re not leading others down the same path.  I know you’ve heard the saying, “People are like sponges” they quickly pick up what they both see and hear.  With all of the tweeting, texting and twerking going on in the world of social / other media (LOL – my spell check kept correcting this word), it’s very easy to cut corners with our grammar.

Lately, I’ve really been focusing on ensuring that I am using proper english when conversing with others.  I do so especially when having conversations with my children.  Texting is quickly becoming their first language which means that at times they forget what “real” english sounds like.  However, I find myself correcting my teenager more so than my 9 year old, who is by the way extremely articulate.  My 9 year old corrects me sometimes.  It also seems that the new norm in many global environments is to send a quick email or text instead of picking up the telephone.  These activities alone cause you to cut corners with your communications and grammar at times since the goal is to keep them brief.  I have to say that I’m guilty of this behavior since I rarely use my desk phone anymore.  Well, that could also be due to the fact that my colleagues or stakeholders hardly ever call me on my desk phone.

I’ve actually started to check my desk phone a couple times per week just to see if I’ve received any messages.  Nope.  I then check my email and normally have a couple hundred.  However, this cultural behavior is now widely accepted in many professional environments.  I’m not saying that it shouldn’t be acceptable in some cases, however I do feel that there should always be a certain amount of face time when communicating with others in the work place, especially when dealing with certain stakeholders.  There is always the option of Video, FaceTime, Skype, etc. if needed.

John McWhorter wrote an article in Time last year called “Is Texting Killing the English Language?“, that I thought helped bring some balance to the topic.  He says, “Texting is developing its own kind of grammar and conventions.  Worldwide people speak differently from the way they write, and texting — quick, casual and only intended to be read once — is actually a way of talking with your fingers.  All indications are that America’s youth are doing it quite well. Texting, far from being a scourge, is a work in progress.”  Personally, I am going to remain open to the concept to see how it evolves in the future.

To get back to the topic at hand “25 Phrases…” I’d like to ensure that the words that leave my mouth are both positive and accurate to the best of my ability.  I can do this orally or through use of the written word whether it’s through texting, emailing, etc.  I have a responsibility to leave a legacy for my children that they then can pass on to their children.  I’d also just rather pick up the telephone on occasion or have a face to face chat over coffee or lunch.  I simply enjoy having productive conversations since brief ones can sometimes take more time and turn into several more — if you know what I mean.  What are your thoughts?

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